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Frazer-Nash exploring decarbonisation of General Aviation for Department for Transport

23/03/2022
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Frazer-Nash has been appointed by the Department for Transport to collect data on the carbon emissions produced by General Aviation airfields and operations.

Frazer-Nash Consultancy has been appointed by the Department for Transport to collect data on the carbon emissions produced by General Aviation airfields and operations.

General Aviation (GA) refers to all non-scheduled civil aviation, including private business travel, sport and leisure, and search and rescue. The research aims to provide a preliminary evidence base of carbon emissions in the GA sector from existing infrastructure, to inform future opportunities for decarbonisation and green infrastructure, and the cost of green infrastructure.

Describing the problem GA faces to deliver on decarbonisation targets, Frazer-Nash Senior Business Manager, Tim Myall, said:

“General Aviation is facing a huge challenge – the UK Government has set ambitious decarbonisation commitments for aviation, but with an ageing infrastructure and diverse operations, sector wide decarbonisation of this area is very different to that of the commercial sector.

“This research will help the DfT to understand the scale of the issue, and the scope of the challenge to be overcome. By providing information on the infrastructure and technologies already in use, it will set a benchmark against which the achievements of future carbon emission reduction initiatives can be measured, and inform the development of policies to support this.”

Ruth Aldred, the Frazer-Nash Project Manager, outlines the work that Frazer-Nash experts will be undertaking for the DfT as part of the project:

“Drawing upon our expertise in carbon analytics and footprinting, we’ll use aircraft movements data and fuel utilisation data to understand the carbon emissions from general aviation aircraft. We will then conduct detailed case studies of airfields to quantify carbon emissions from ground infrastructure.

“We’ll undertake research to identify the potential green infrastructure technologies and solutions that can help General Aviation to meet its decarbonisation targets, drawing upon our experience across a range of industries.

“Then we’ll look at how these technologies and solutions could be implemented in the GA sector, using our experience of developing decarbonisation strategies to examine the likely costs and benefits of sourcing and implementing this infrastructure.”

GA supports significant business and commercial activities, including business aviation, manufacturing, maintenance, and flight training. It contributes nearly £3 billion gross value added (GVA) a year to the UK economy, directly and indirectly, and supports nearly 40,000 jobs: around 10,000 jobs through flying activity and approximately 30,000 jobs in GA manufacturing.

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